Copyright

Copyright
Video Copyright

General Copyright Guidelines

Copyright gives the creator of an original work legal rights to it, usually for a limited period of time. In Canada, copyright is governed by the Copyright Act. Copyright applies to works such as books, articles, music, videos/DVDs, photographs, paintings, digital works (i.e. websites), and performances.

Fair dealing for the limited purpose of research or private study, criticism or review, or reporting current events does not infringe copyright, but is qualified by a number of considerations.

On December 31, 2013, Western University’s agreement with Access Copyright ended. This agreement also governed Brescia University College. Please use the information on Western University’s copyright webpage to guide your use of copyrighted materials.

How much can I copy?

As a general guideline, copying a portion of up to 10 percent of a work is likely within your fair dealing rights. More that 10 percent may also be fine under certain circumstances such as copying:

  • a journal article from a periodical or a single chapter from a book
  • a short story, poem, play or essay from a book or periodical
  • an entire reproduction of an artistic work or a single music score from a book or periodical
  • an entire entry from an dictionary, encyclopedia, or similar reference work

Keep in mind that both quantity and quality factor into fair dealing analysis. Employing fair dealing scope factors in addition to amount may be necessary if copying of a work exceeds 10 percent or when the copying is of a single chapter of a book that consists of only 2 or 3 chapters in total, for example. In some circumstances an entire work may be reproduced, such as a poem, a photograph or a drawing when it is part of a collection or anthology.

These are only general guidelines.

Many people can be held accountable when the Copyright Act is violated: you and/or the College may be subject to substantial civil and criminal penalties, which can include hefty fines, imprisonment or both.

Please contact Jim Mei, Director of Library Services for further information.

Video Copyright Guidelines

Under the Copyright Act of Canada, any film used in a public place must have Public Performance Rights (PPR). Classrooms, student lounges, etc. are considered public places.

Films, videos, and DVDs in the Beryl Ivey Library collection are purchased with public performance rights, which allows them to be shown in the classroom. In addition, through the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL), the library has licensed PPR access to the full suite of National Film Board films, documentaries, animations and alternative dramas on the web. To discover what’s available, go to NFB.ca. Television news programs can be copied and played in classes provided it is done within a year of the program being aired. Documentaries are not covered by this provision.

As commercial feature films and DVDs typically do not come with PPR, they need to be covered by an annual site license with one of the two major Canadian distributors of feature films, Criterion Pictures and Audio Cine Films, Inc. The studios or producers whose work is covered by the site licenses can be found by following the foregoing links. If the video is produced by a studio covered by the College’s site license, it may be shown legally on Brescia property. The videos/DVDs must be legal copies and can be rented, purchased, borrowed or personal copies.

The Copyright Act applies even if …

  • Films are rented, purchased or personally owned;
  • Films are only partially shown, e.g. just “clips”;
  • Films are shown within a non-profit, educational context;
  • Films are shown to small groups.

Many people can be held accountable when the Copyright Act is violated: you and/or the College may be subject to substantial civil and criminal penalties, which can include hefty fines, imprisonment or both.

Please contact Jim Mei, Director of Library Services for further information.